Help Center

We're here to help. If you would rather not read, simply call us for answers at 877-346-4410.

Placing an Order

How long does it take to ship my order?
Once my order ships, how long will it take to reach me?
What are my shipping options and what do you charge?
Do you ship internationally?
Can I send my purchase as a gift?
Is my credit card information secure?
More questions about placing an order?

Tracking an Order

How can I track my order?
Can I change my order once it's placed?
More questions about tracking?

You've Received Your Order

My order arrived damaged. Now what?
What is your return policy?
How do I return an item?
How do I exchange my order?
Any more questions?

Finding the Right Surfboard

How do I select the surfboard that is right for me?
What shape (or outline) should I select?
How do I know what dimensions are right for me?
What about specific longboard styles?
How do I choose a fin system?
Why does a rocker matter?
What's the difference in tail performance?
What do I look for in rail design?
What type of bottom contours are available?
How do the glassing and finish vary?
What shaper is right for me?
How do I buy a used surfboard?
Do you take custom surfboard orders?
More questions about finding the right surfboard?

Placing an Order

How long does it take to ship my order?
Orders placed before noon Pacific Time on any business day will ship the same day. Orders placed on weekends, holidays, or after noon Pacific Time will ship the following business day.

Once my order ships, how long will it take to reach me?
That depends on what you order, what shipping option you choose, and how close you live to the shipping warehouse. We can get just about any item to anyone in the contiguous US in five business days or less. For more detail, see our Shipping Facts.

What are my shipping options and what do you charge?
Please view our Shipping Chart for available shipping options and charges. You will have an opportunity to select the option that best suits your situation during Step 2 of the checkout process. If you do not see a suitable option, please contact us and we will do everything we can to accommodate your order.

Do you ship internationally?
Yes, we ship many (though not all) of our items to international addresses. Canadian orders are typically shipped via UPS. For all other international destinations (including APO addresses), we typically use the United States Postal Service. You can determine the shipping charge by entering your address in Step 1 of the checkout process.

In all cases, your international order may be subject to certain import customs, duties and taxes imposed by your country upon delivery. These charges are NOT included in the prices and shipping costs we quote. As the importer of record, you must comply with your local laws and regulations and pay all applicable duties, taxes and fees. Accordingly, we recommend that you contact your local customs office for an estimate of any applicable taxes and duties you may be charged upon delivery and for further information.

Can I send my purchase as a gift?
Certainly. Step 1 of the checkout process allows you to enter gift information. We apply your gift message directly to the gift receipt (no prices reflected) for free. Make sure the shipping address reflects where you want the gift sent and the billing address reflects the buyer's credit card information.

Is my credit card information secure?
Absolutely. Please refer to our Security Guarantee for specifics.

More questions about placing an order?
Do not hesitate to contact us any time day or night. We will respond to your inquiry as soon as possible.

Tracking an Order

How can I track my order?
Once your order ships we will send you the carrier and tracking number information via email. You can review your package progress by looking up the tracking number on the carrier's website. If you do not have your tracking number, simply enter your order number into the Order Status page. You can find your order number in the subject line of your confirmation email.

Can I change my order once it's placed?
Please contact us immediately. In many cases, we can make changes if requests are given in a timely manner.

More questions about tracking?
Do not hesitate to contact us any time day or night. We will respond to your inquiry as soon as possible.

You've Received Your Order

My order arrived damaged. Now what?
Do not return the item immediately. Instead, contact us as soon as possible to learn how to proceed. In many cases, it must be returned directly to the manufacturer.

If the shipper is still present and the damage is apparent, ask the deliverer for a damaged goods form. Have the delivery person sign the document and contact us.

What is your return policy?
Please see our 110% Return Policy.

How do I return an item?
To return an item simply send the unwanted item to our returns warehouse at:

Surfboards.com
Attn: Returns
9337 Commerce Center St., C1
Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

Assuming it arrives with all tags and in resalable condition, we will credit your account immediately and send you an email confirming the return. We suggest you use a carrier that can confirm delivery and issue insurance (like UPS or FedEx) as we can not be responsible for returned merchandise getting lost or damaged in transit.

For faster processing, please include your order number in the packaging.

How do I exchange my order?
To effectuate an exchange simply return the item with a note indicating the size or color you prefer. We will call with questions.

If you want to exchange an item quickly (rather than waiting for the returned item to get to us), simply order the new item as you normally would and we will credit your account when we receive your return.

Any more questions?
Do not hesitate to contact us any time day or night. We will respond to your inquiry as soon as possible.

Finding the Right Surfboard

How do I select the surfboard that is right for me?
Selecting the right surfboard is part art and part science. Much depends on your size (height and weight), surfing ability, and the size/shape of the waves you ride.

To fit the surfer to a surfboard, the shapers vary the surfboard's outline, length, width, thickness, tail, rocker, material, rail, contours, fiberglass, and more to make surfboards that perform superbly for a variety of surfers in a variety of wave conditions.

The single most important factor when selecting a surfboard is choosing the correct outline – the curves of the surfboard as viewed from above. Secondly, it's selecting the correct size (length, width and thickness) to ensure the proper float. The rocker, tail, bottom profile, rail, etc are secondary considerations that are best left to the shapers' discretion and experience for all but the best surfers.

The surfboards listed on our site are made by some of the world's best shapers. They have carefully crafted their designs to reflect their years of experience and feedback from countless surfers. If you're not sure exactly what you want, trust the shapers and their designs. They are the best in the business.

What shape (or outline) should I select?
The repeated challenge for the surfboarding community is whether to sacrifice waves for performance or performance for waves. In general, the longer, straighter surfboards have more paddling power so the surfer can catch more waves with less effort. However, the larger surfboards lack speed and turning ability. Conversely, smaller surfboards have the advantage of extreme maneuverability. Tight turns, vertical movement, even aerials are possible on some surfboards. But they are harder to paddle and catch waves.

Each shape has its own unique characteristics:

Longboards – As the name implies, longboards are generally the longest surfboards available with lengths ranging from eight to twelve or even fifteen feet. The newest designs are influenced by the shortboard to allow for more maneuverability. They are lighter and easier to handle. You can catch your share of waves and have a blast on a longboard even if you are not in peak condition. Yet you can also improve your skills and perform radical maneuvers not possible on the older longboards. Moreover, it's easier to ride a longboard in small waves and mushy conditions that just don't provide the power needed to effectively carve with a shortboard.

Most adults should seriously consider learning to surf on a longboard. Have fun, catch waves, and get the basics down. As you become comfortable on a longboard, you can work your way down in surfboard size to suit your ability and style.

Shortboards – These surfboards are generally defined as high performance between 5'6" and 7'0". The top pros ride shortboards because they make the most radical moves possible in the most critical wave sections. Most shortboards incorporate a basic three fin (thruster) design. The main drawback for many surfers is the amount of physical effort required to paddle a shortboard and to accelerate to a speed necessary to catch waves. The other disadvantage for a beginner is the initial feeling of instability.

Hybrid surfboards – There are many intermediately sized surfboards which offer some of the advantages of both longboards and shortboards. These include "hybrids," best described as long shortboards, "eggs" or "fun boards" which are more like short longboards. These are generally in the seven to eight foot range and may be perfect if you want to catch waves easier than on a true shortboard but still maintain greater maneuverability than a full longboard.

Fish style surfboards – The current fish designs are reinventions of a design that came into prominence in the late 70's. In general, fish surfboards have a full nose, parallel outline, wide swallow tail, and two large fins (or occasionally one small fin). Today's fish is generally ridden in lengths of 5'8"-6'6". Some designs have wings and most bottoms have generally flatter rockers for increased speed. The fish design works best in average surf conditions although it can be ridden in nearly any condition by an experienced surfer.

How do I know what dimensions are right for me?
Shortboards – Size is very subjective because the amount of flotation you need depends on your physical strength and experience, both of which affect your ability to paddle and catch waves. Even very small differences in length, width, and thickness are detectable to an experienced rider. If you are experienced, you probably already know what size you want. If you are a beginner or intermediate of average build, a good rule of thumb for a shortboard of average proportion is to ride a shortboard about six inches over your height. If you are lanky, knock off a couple of inches from the surfboard. If you are stocky, add length and/or thickness to your surfboards. Best recommendation for first-timers? Borrow your friends' surfboards and see what feels right or at least what feels too big or too small.

Longboards – Exact dimensions are less critical for the longboard rider. The best fit is reflected in the longboard's ability to float the surfer. Laying still on a longboard, you should be able to center yourself so the nose is an inch or two above the surface and the rest of the surfboard slopes slightly toward the tail. At the end, the tail should be a few inches beneath the surface. When paddling with the nose a couple of inches above the surface the "trim" of the surfboard should be about level, and when you stop paddling your surfboard should continue to glide for several feet. Expect some water to run over the rails along your body. If you remain dry your longboard floats you too well decreasing maneuverability unnecessarily.

If your surfboard floats you correctly, you should be able to sprint up to a plane for takeoffs and your longboard should begin to accelerate or glide down the face of a wave without the wave having to be extremely steep. If you find yourself paddling down the face of waves for steep, late takeoffs like a shortboarder, you probably don't have enough speed. That lack of speed is usually the result of inadequate flotation (exaggerated rocker compounds the problem).

What about specific longboard styles?
Certain longboard designs that combine outline, rocker, rail design, and fin placement can be further characterized as a "style" or "model" of surfboard. These surfboards are designed to excel in certain wave conditions or to suit a particular style of surfing.

Noserider – Most proven designs are characterized by wide noses with medium to low rail lines and soft concaves under the nose. These surfboards have considerable rocker and come in both single and tri-fin configurations. These surfboards turn easily and are very fun to ride in a broad range of conditions. They are less appropriate for bigger, faster waves, and the wide nose design can make it somewhat difficult to drop into a wave when strong offshore winds are blowing. If you own only one surfboard, this is probably the type you will enjoy the most.

Classic – Don't confuse "classic" with "old fashioned" surfboards. Classic longboards have more pointed noses and in many cases, a slightly convex bottom. Nose and tail have a flatter rocker for speed, and the rail line is quite low for the last two thirds of the surfboard for clean release and high-speed turning ability. These surfboards are available in both single and tri-fin designs. These are beautiful surfboards which are usually set off with three stringer layouts or classic color designs. This is the surfboard to ride on big or hollow days speed is paramount. They are also suited to anyone who prefers to surf with a smoother turning style.

High Performance – These surfboards, often signature models of professional team riders, are designed for maximum performance and minimum weight. They are usually ridden somewhat smaller than other models, and are designed for the experienced rider. They are usually narrower, have increased rocker, and generally incorporate noserider noses and low, hard rail lines. They are generally built of very light foam, glassed with lighter-than-standard glass, and sealed with a sprayed or wiped finish to further reduce weight. Three-fin configurations are the norm. Though somewhat less durable than standard longboards, they are unmatched for quick, radical maneuvers.

How do I choose a fin system?
Fins are the steering mechanism of the surfboard. The fin placement, size, shape and composition have a profound effect on the way a surfboard handles. Even small changes can make a significant difference to the discriminating surfer. The number of fins can range from 1 – 5 though the most common fin systems have either one or three.

Over the last few years, fin designs, number, shape and location have become the biggest area of surfboard exploration. With the return of the removable fins systems (whereby surfers can change fins using a screw or snap) it is easier for surfers to experiment with different fins. Besides allowing for fin experiments, removable fin systems ease travel challenges.

There are three prominent removable fin systems. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses.

FCS – If you're traveling or doing a lot of international surfing, the FCS system may be your best choice because you can find FCS fins almost anywhere. They are easily identified by their two post system which doesn't provide the stability of other box systems. The top of the surfboard may start to warp over time because the posts go all the way through to the deck.

Future – Unlike the two post system, Futures grip the entire length of the fin decreasing unusual torque.

LockBox Fin – They also grip the entire length of the fin though the fins are not as available as FCS internationally. LockBox offers a fin adapter so if you were to break a fin while traveling, you could use an FCS fin in the LockBox system. In addition, LockBox allows some movement in the box so you can change the lateral position of a fin. And in the rare event a fin breaks away, it's less likely to take the entire rail.

Glass on fins are the stiffest (because they are permanently fiberglassed to the surfboard) but they are hard to travel with and all decisions are permanent.

Longboards have traditionally been single fins, but many modern surfboards are tri-fins with a large middle fin and two small side fins. The large middle fin helps keep the surfboard from spinning out or side slipping but it will also effect the looseness during turns.

When ordering a surfboard, the most versatile setup is two side plugs for the small fins and a large box in the middle. This way you can switch around if need be to a smaller or larger middle fin with or without side fins, or switch to only a single center fin.

The placement of the fins will effect turns a lot. Moving the middle fin forward in the box will loosen up the surfboard for tighter turns in smaller surf. Moving the fin back will increase stability and perform more gradual turns. Most single fins are placed a little farther back than the middle fin on a tri-fin setup to ensure it will hold into the wave.

Why does a rocker matter?
Rocker is the curve of a surfboard from nose to tail as viewed from the side. Crafting combinations of rockers is the shapers most secretive and skillful art. Most shapers have their own combinations which have been tried and tested over many years.

Surfboards with flatter rockers are faster and have more stability because there is more surface area in the water. This can help beginners or more competent surfers by using wave positioning to extract drive and flow to get maximum speed from the wave.

Surfboards with a more pronounced curve (more rocker) are more maneuverable but have less speed. Their curves fit well in the curved pocket of the wave.

What's the difference in tail performance?
The shape of your tail is by far the most recognizable feature of a surfboard design. Although the shapes and functions of tail designs vary greatly, it takes a surfer with some experience to be able to recognize the difference in feel from one tail design to another.

Pin – The fastest tail shape and are the recognized answer to big wave surfing because of their good hold, carving turns and fast drive.

Round – Also called a rounded pin. It is also suited to flowing turns and has more tail area than the pin tail. Because of more area it is more forgiving.

Squash – Squash tail is one of the most requested tail shapes. This shape has a more abrupt end to the surfboard so it's more pivotal with less drag than the longer pin tails. It is forgiving, has good drive and clean outlines. A great choice for most conditions.

Rounded Square – Another common tail for all conditions. Subtle change from the squash with a bit more tail area (for more maneuverability) and less rounded than the squash (for more drive).

Square – The most severe tail with unforgiving edges. For surfers of more advanced ability they can increase speed and give a definite turning edge but would not be suited to fat, mushy waves. It's best for a high performance surfboard and extremely sensitive surfing.

Swallow – The Swallow tail has the most tail area of all designs. It has good leverage for sharper turns and is a great small wave radical combination. It is great for beach breaks and snapping in the pocket.

What do I look for in rail design?
Most shapers will agree the rails are the most difficult part of a surfboard to shape. The rails are the meeting point between the outline, the bottom contours, and curves. The modern rail follows a smooth flowing transition from thin and soft in the nose, rounder, egg-shaped with a very subtle edge in the center, to a thin hard edge in the back third of the surfboard. Each section should blend smoother into the next without any abrupt transitions, similar to a clean rocker.

The rolled rail is the most forgiving, easiest rail design. It's perfect for beginners. The edge is tucked under rail creating a sensation of lift and bite.

The boxy rail gives more drive and is more buoyant due to increased volume. It's best suited for a more experienced surfer.

The low rail will act like a knife in the water working well in small surf. The apex of the rail plan shape is located at or near the bottom of the surfboard.

What type of bottom contours are available?
The bottom of a surfboard doesn't have to be flat (as viewed from the end). There are several alternatives to a flat surfboard that effect performance.

Flat – Flat bottoms are the simplest answer that gives speed in all situations. It gives a smooth ride in choppy waves. It is a good beginner surfboard and good for floaters and climbing white water.

Reverse Vee – Reverse vee is a great combination with few hang-ups. It means a vee that is forward on the surfboard that leads the surfboard into smooth turns and supplies great rail to rail surfing. It suits people who surf on their front foot and gives them easier direction changes. It is a good bottom configuration for the front of the surfboard.

Vee – The Vee refers to the back half of the surfboard and is quite an understated dimension. It is best suited for big waves in combination with a pin tail. It is a dimension that modern shapers are playing around with a lot. It is very loose and creates a pivot point in the centre of the surfboard.

Single concave – Single concave is a very popular bottom profile because of its speed. They have been increasingly used in combination with a double concave because on its own, a single concave can suck to the face of the wave and track on a wave leading to a loss of maneuverability. The most prominent bottom configuration for shortboards is currently concaves...either a full length single concave, which works great in good walled up surf, or a single concave that feeds into soft double concaves. This bottom design adds a bit lift to the tail, increasing looseness and speed. When you put it all together and hold up the surfboard...it just feels right!

Double concave – A double concave accentuates the vee (raised portion on the stringer) and gives more lift, speed and rail to rail transition in all sorts of waves.

Single/Double Concave – This is the most commonly experimented bottom profile for shortboards. It combines the advantages of both of the concave bottom designs and seems to eliminate their pitfalls. It is a great combination because it alleviates the tracking of the single and enhances the double concave giving more speed through turns and loosens up the feel of the surfboard.

How do the glassing and finish vary?
Most surfboards are finished with fiberglass cloth. Fiberglass is sold by the yard and the weight of the cloth refers to the amount of resin required to saturate a yard of the cloth. For example, 6-ounce cloth requires 6 ounces of resin to wet one yard; 4-ounce cloth requires 4 ounces of resin to saturate one yard of cloth, etc. 6-ounce and 4-ounce are the most common weights of fiberglass cloth used in the surfing industry.

"S" and "E" cloth refers to the specific fiberglass cloth used in the process. "S" cloth claims to be 30% stronger than "E" cloth.

The strength of the glass job is largely determined by the weight and layers of the fiberglass cloth. The standard competition weight is two 4-ounce fiberglass layers on the top (deck) of the surfboard and one 4-ounce layer on the bottom. The next higher strength is one 6-ounce layer and one 4-ounce layer on top and one 4-ounce layer on the bottom. If still more strength is desired, look for a surfboard with one 6-ounce layer and one 4-ounce layer on top and one 6-ounce layer on the bottom. A very strong surfboard would have two 6-ounce layers on the top with one 6-ounce layer on the bottom.

If you are ding prone or break a lot of surfboards, choose a surfboard with stronger glass. It makes the surfboard heavier therefore less maneuverable but may be worth the durability.

Surfboards typically have a sanded or a gloss and polish finish. Surfboards with a sanded finish are lighter albeit duller than their glossed counterparts. They are also more porous which leads to water damage and deterioration. The gloss and polished surfboards are more durable and have that super shine.

What shaper is right for me?
All shapers listed on Surfboards.com do excellent work. Review the shapers bios (a link is provided on the More Detail page) and find one that fits the bill.

How do I buy a used surfboard?
We sell the new surfboards right through our site. Simply add to cart and checkout. For used and custom surfboards, you need to contact the owner or shaper respecitvely. Their contact information is available on the product page.

Do you take custom surfboard orders?
That's the beauty. Every order is custom after you speak with the shaper.

More questions about finding the right surfboard?
Do not hesitate to contact us any time day or night. We will respond to your inquiry as soon as possible.